Dr. Long NEW
Dr. Suzanna Long

Professor

Engineering Management & Systems Engineering

Dr. Suzanna Long is Professor and Department Chair of the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She has internationally recognized research expertise in critical infrastructure systems management focused on transportation/supply chain-logistics management, energy systems and organizational systems planning and effectiveness.

 

Dr. Long has received research awards totaling over $18 million dollars as PI or co-PI from the National Science Foundation, the USDOT Federal Highway Administration, United States Geological Survey, the Missouri Department of Transportation, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, and the U.S. Federal Transit Authority. Prior to joining the academy, Dr. Long gained national recognition as a federal electronic records archivist focused on big data analytics.

 

Dr. Long has led national research teams focused on post-disaster restoration of supply chain infrastructure. These efforts utilize complex adaptive systems and agent-based modeling techniques that integrate quantitative and qualitative inputs to create real-time decision tools. These tools integrate the realms of engineering, social and behavioral sciences, and cyber-physical systems. She has also led data analytics and decision-making transportation studies resulting in more than $500,000 in O&M savings for the Missouri Department of Transportation.

 

Research Interests:

Post-Disaster Restoration of Supply Chain Infrastructure, Energy Infrastructure Systems Security and Resilience

  • Missouri Alternate Lane Shift Configurations Analysis
  • Missouri Alternate Merge Sign Configurations Analysis
  • Integrating Geospatial Data into Multi-Hazards SCN Restoration Strategies
  • MARMET

Missouri Alternate Lane Shift Configurations Analysis


Work Zone Simulator Analysis: Driver Performance and Acceptance of Missouri Alternate Lane Shift Configurations

 

Dr. Ruwen Qin Project 2 Image

 

INVESTIGATORS
Suzanna Long (PI), Dincer Konur (Co-PI), Ruwen Qin (Co-PI) and Ming Leu (Co-PI) 


FUNDING SOURCE
Missouri Department of Transportation, Intelligent Systems Center, and Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Missouri S&T.


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
This project develops driving scenarios using the Missouri S&T driver simulator for use in the evaluation of a Missouri alternate lane shift sign configuration for work zones. Drivers will complete the scenarios comparing the current Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) approved merge sign configuration with an alternate merge sign configuration proposed by Missouri Department of Transportation (MODOT). Specifically, the project evaluates and compares the driving behavior of different driver categories (grouped based on gender and age range) with MODOT and FHWA signs.


PUBLICATIONS
*this project is still in progress.

Missouri Alternate Merge Sign Configurations Analysis


Work Zone Simulator Analysis: Driver Performance and Acceptance of Missouri Alternate Merge Sign Configurations


Dr. Ruwen Qin Project 3 Image

 

INVESTIGATORS
Suzanna Long (PI), Dincer Konur (Co-PI), Ruwen Qin (Co-PI) and Ming Leu (Co-PI) 


FUNDING SOURCE
Missouri Department of Transportation, Intelligent Systems Center, and Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Missouri S&T.


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Improving work zone road safety is an issue of great interest due to the high number of crashes observed in work zones. Departments of Transportation (DOTs) use a variety of methods to inform drivers of upcoming work zones. One method used by DOTs is work zone signage configuration. It is necessary to evaluate the efficiency of different configurations, by law, before implementation of new signage designs that deviate from national standards. This research presents a driving simulator based study, funded by the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) that evaluates a driver’s response to work zone sign configurations. This study has compared the Conventional Lane Merge (CLM) configurations against MoDOT's alternate configurations. Study participants within target populations, chosen to represent a range of Missouri drivers, have attempted four work zone configurations, as part of a driving simulator experience. The test scenarios simulated both right and left work zone lane closures for both the CLM and MoDOT alternatives. Travel time was measured against demographic characteristics of test driver populations. Statistical data analysis was used to investigate the efficiency of different configurations employed in the study. The results of this study were compared to results from a previous MoDOT study.


PUBLICATIONS

  1. Use of traffic simulators to determine driver response to work zone configurations”, Moradpour, S., S.Wu, S. Long, M. C. Leu, D. Konur, R. Qin. 2015. Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Management 2015 International Annual Conference (Eds. S. Long, E-H. Ng, and A. Squires). 

Integrating Geospatial Data into Multi-Hazards SCN Restoration Strategies


Integrating Geospatial Data into Multi-Hazards Supply Chain Network Restoration Strategies

Dr. Long USGS Project Image

INVESTIGATORS
Suzanna Long (PI), longsuz@mst.edu, 573-341-7621; Steven Corns, (Co-PI), cornss@mst.edu.


FUNDING SOURCE
U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Missouri S&T.


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The research addresses the importance of achieving greater cultural awareness and understanding of the ramifications of scalable, resilient supply chain network (SCN) solutions in post extreme event restoration.  Innovative infrastructure management solutions must be based on comprehensive definitions of sustainability and begin with changes in human behavior. Our research creates a unique methodology designed to interface sociotechnical decision points in order to develop well-trained engineers capable of providing comprehensive, scalable SCN management solutions. 


PUBLICATIONS

  1. Post-disaster Supply Chain Interdependent Critical Infrastructure System Restoration Modeling: A Review of Necessary Data,” Ramachandran, Varun, Long, Suzanna, Shoberg, Tom, Corns, Steven M. and Carlo, Hector J. (2016) Data Sciences Journal, 15: 1, pp. 1-13.
  2. Identifying Geographical Interdependency in Critical Infrastructure Systems Using Open Source Geospatial Data in Order to Model Restoration Strategies in the Aftermath of a Large-Scale Disaster,” Ramachandran, Varun, Shoberg, Tom, Long, Suzanna,Corns, Steven M. and Carlo, Hector J. (2015) International Journal of Geospatial and Environmental Research 2 (1/4): 1-19.
  3. Framework for Modeling Urban Socioeconomic Resilience Time in the Aftermath of an Extreme Event,” Ramachandran, Varun, Long, Suzanna, Shoberg, Tom, Corns, Steven M. and Carlo, Hector J. (2015) Natural Hazards Review.
  4. Integrating Complexity into Data-Driven Multi-Hazard Supply Chain Network Strategies,” Long, Suzanna, Shoberg, Tom, Ramachandran, Varun, Corns, Steven, and Carlo, Hector, Proceedings of the CaGIS/ASPRS 2013 Specialty Conference, San Antonio, TX, October 2013. Invited.

MARMET


MidAmerica Regional Microgrid Education and Training Consortium

Dr. Long MARMET Project Image

INVESTIGATORS
Suzanna Long (PI), longsuz@mst.edu, 573-341-7621; with Missouri S&T Co-PIs: Mariesa L. Crow, crow@mst.edu; Jonathan Kimball, kimballjw@mst.edu; Pourya Shamsi, shamsip@mst.edu.


FUNDING SOURCE
U.S. Department of Energy


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The MARMET consortium integrates cutting-edge research and advanced instructional methods to create a flexible, evolving approach to microgrid training for all levels of student. High penetration PV in microgrid systems has raised many issues regarding operation and control.  Researchers globally are addressing these issues, but the time lag from cutting-edge discovery to the classroom can often be many years. To counteract this effect, the MARMET consortium focuses on the rapid development of modular material to capture and reflect the newest trends in electric power engineering and to make it available in traditional and non-traditional settings.   Developed material is used in university courses, workshops, and industry short courses.

The four universities have well-established, highly ranked power engineering programs.  Along with their industry partners, they form a strong regional partnership serving the students and engineers of Mid-America. Although the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) is headquartered in Arlington, VA, many rural populations throughout mid-America are served by their utility members, making them an integral member of the MARMET team.  As a result of their regional proximity, many of the participating faculty have prior research collaborations (i.e. through PSERC) and this curriculum development partnership is a natural extension.
 

PUBLICATIONS 

  1. "An accurate small-signal model of inverter-dominated islanded microgrids using dq reference frame," Md. Rasheduzzaman, J. A. Mueller, J. W. Kimball, IEEE Journal on Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, vol. 2, pp. 1070-1080, Dec. 2014.
  2. Optimal Sizing of a Vanadium Redox Battery System for Microgrid Systems,” Tu Nguyen, M. L. Crow, and A. C. Elmore, IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Energy, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 729 – 737, July 2015.
  3. "Economic Dispatch for an Agent-Based Community Microgrid," P. Shamsi; H. Xie; A. Longe; J. Y. Joo, in IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid , vol.PP, no.99, pp.1-8 (in press, Early Access available)