• Powder-based Additive Manufacturing of Batteries
  • Femtosecond Laser based Micro/Nano Additive Manufacturing with Nanomaterials

Powder-based Additive Manufacturing of Batteries


Powder-based Additive Manufacturing of Batteries


Dr. Pan Project 1


INVESTIGATORS
Heng Pan (hp5c7@mst.edu, 573-341-4896)
 

FUNDING SOURCE
National Science Foundation
 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most widely used batteries due to their high energy density, long cycle life, and low self-discharge. With the rapid development of portable electronics, electrical vehicles, and grid systems, lithium-ion batteries will be more widely employed. However, current slurry based battery electrode manufacturing is costly, preventing wide applications of lithium-ion batteries. The organic solvent typically used in the slurry can be expensive. In addition, a time-consuming and energy-intensive drying procedure has to be employed. The evaporated solvent also needs to be recovered in order to prevent potential environmental pollution. Therefore, it is desirable to have solvent-free battery manufacturing processes. This project focuses on fundamental research to form the knowledge base for development of solvent-free battery manufacturing processes. A major technical challenge in developing solvent-free battery manufacturing processes is to homogeneously disperse battery materials including active materials, conductive additives, and binder materials. This research aims to provide the new knowledge needed to overcome this challenge: (1) interfacial properties of the battery materials, (2) binder distribution characteristics during battery powder mixing, and (3) molten binder wettability and spreading kinetics on other materials during binder melting.

 

PUBLICATIONS

 “Solvent-free Manufacturing of Electrodes for Lithium-ion Batteries”, B. Ludwig, Z. Zheng, W. Shou, Y. Wang, H. Pan, Scientific Reports, 6, 23150, 2016

Femtosecond Laser based Micro/Nano Additive Manufacturing with Nanomaterials


Femtosecond Laser-based Micro/Nano Additive Manufacturing with Nanomaterials

Dr. Pan Project 2


INVESTIGATORS

Heng Pan (hp5c7@mst.edu, 573-341-4896)


FUNDING SOURCE
National Science Foundation

 
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
With the coming era of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), there is an increasing need for miniaturized smart devices, such as smart sands, tags, and wearable/implantable devices, for various biomedical and environmental monitoring applications. Many critical components in these devices, such as sensors, antennas, inter-connects and batteries are not compatible with conventional Integrated Circuits (IC) processes used in the semiconductor industry. In addition, it is difficult for conventional semiconductor manufacturing foundries to accommodate customized specifications due to the lack of flexibility in process and material choices. Additive manufacturing has the potential to meet such requirements.

Current micro/nanoscale additive manufacturing is limited by the lack of capability to fabricate 3D non-polymer functional devices. To overcome this limit, this research employs non-polymer (metal, semiconductor and dielectric) nanomaterials as building blocks and aims at understanding and exploiting unique behaviors of these nanomaterials under ultrafast laser excitation to enable 3D Nano-AM processes. Firstly, fundamental mechanisms leading to femtosecond laser induced ionization and surface modification of nanomaterials will be explored. Secondly, the correlations between laser excitation (ionization and modification) and induced nanomaterial assembly, deposition and sintering behaviors will be established. Multiscale modeling and simulations (Ab initio, classical Molecular Dynamics, and Brownian Dynamics) will be performed to understand experimental results over different temporal and spatial scales. Finally, a physics-based model relating nanomaterials properties, laser excitation conditions with the morphology and properties of manufactured nanostructures will be developed.
 

PUBLICATIONS

Direct Printing of Microstructures by Femtosecond Laser Excitation of Nanocrystals in Solution”, W Shou and H. Pan, Applied Physics Letters, 108 (21), 214101, 2016